Would you say that to a man?: The tiny cuts of workplace sexism. 

Would you say that to a man?: The tiny cuts of workplace sexism. 

After a brief stint in corporate America and having just passed the two year mark as Founder of my first startup, I’m aware of sexism in the workplace more than ever.

  

 With the equal pay conversations coming to a head, I think it’s important to continue educating career-women, especially those 20-something’s entering the workforce for the first time.

When I first entered the work world I experienced most of the infractions cited in the following article but brushed many, if not all of them off, especially having been raised in a gender-specific society opposed to now, where Microsoft writes letters to young girls telling them to continue their path toward tech and commercials encourage them to live life “like a girl”, and not in the context which the media told me in the late 80s and 90s.

 I appreciate reminders to be aware of these minor infractions, or tiny cuts, but also am acutely aware that to change requires a new way of educating our young people about gender equality. To create collaborative teams from grade school on will have a great impact on the workplaces of the future. Leaning in is great, as long as there’s no one behind you pushing you over the edge, male or female.

Of Means and Ends

sexism

“I’m not going to apply for the job because I want you to get it.”

I was in my mid-20s and a promotion opened up in my division at work and I planned to apply for it. Given the hierarchy in our department, one male coworker and I were the natural ones to consider for the job. When the topic came up, that’s what he said to me: “I’m not going to apply for the job because I want you to get it.” I don’t remember what I said in the moment, but I remember quietly seething and thinking, “Don’t do me any favors. Go ahead and apply and I’ll still get it.”

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